The problem with ‘Mother Earth’: We need to stop creating nature

When I was in school and social studies was introduced into our curriculum, I remember the only result of it being heavily involved was a set of flashcards on school bulletin boards. I remember laughing with my friend, like school kids do in front of them and complaining about running out of paper.saving the environment.’

But as I walked the glittering highways, years down the line, I now realized what I had forgotten. As those graph papers danced in my memory, I remembered the image of the world with big doe eyes and eyes. In other pictures, those eyes are crying big tears, and after the “save mother earth” slogan.

It’s fair to say that most of us don’t ask how’world‘ give up ‘mother earth‘, although you need soil and seed to fully jump on the reproduction metaphor train.

One can argue from the stories. In India, for example, in many Kali traditions, the story says that tandav done as an act of anger at the sins committed by man in the world. In that sense, many read Kali as an angry avatar of nature.

One of my favorite horror movies, Tumbbad, also collect the same equation. This film mixes fiction with reality to heighten the dark reality of environmental exploitation. In this story, we hear the story of the goddess of prosperity‘whose belly is said to be the world.

Again, that’s not allwoman‘and’kind of‘, of course mother nature. According to Hilary Klein, women’s and men’s communication involves a close relationship between ‘woman‘, ‘kind of‘, and ‘mother‘ to do the right thing about the nature of the female subject. He added: “The statement that women see work as an activity that is “closer to nature,” (…) repositions the principle of ‘woman’ in the context of ‘nature’ ..”

Based on the same example, he gives wealth and food to his children until they can survive. But as the story progresses, her son Hastar becomes a greedy villain and tries to steal all his mother’s gifts for himself.

As punishment, he was reduced to a demonic and monster-like existence. Set in 1918, we see the story of a family’s quest to find the wealth of Hastar, a quest that doesn’t end well. However, the boy Vinayak decided to pursue wealth in spite of his mother’s advice which ultimately, managed to get it.

Growing rich by the day from Hastar’s wealth, evil entered his life. I won’t spoil the outcome for you, but ultimately, there are dire consequences of stealing from mother earth, in this case, from the womb of a goddess-a metaphor that clearly shows how to do it. .

Also read: ‘Mother Earth’— Is nature created to make men feel superior?

In various documents, land is depicted as a woman, enslaved, robbed, and deprived of her wealth. A memoir of a man. Disney is a favorite Ocean, based on a Polynesian myth, about a male witch who steals the heart of a goddess. Fiji and left in anger.

When angry, the character turns into a mother, chasing the child for revenge. No wonder, even with the new epidemic,’natural punishment‘ is a part of the conversation.

But this relationship does not appear in history. One of my favorite women, Hilary Klein Stories even Marx did “a male subject” who is ‘activities‘ carve out the character in its own way. Nature, a first lady for this subject, is then transformed into glass. In other words, he creates a mirror for reality – a mirror that reflects male desire.

There are teachings in the world, including religion, about what to do when the dream becomes reality. Perhaps, the creation of the female form began as a mere fantasy. But given the current state of the environment, we need more action than just ideas to fight environmental change.

Difficult in theory, but as an image – a woman looking in the mirror, looking at herself as if under the gaze of her admiring husbands produces a frightening scene. My concern here, though not original, is with the persistent notion of theory, tradition, and popular culture, as they further support the hierarchical dichotomy of ‘male and female‘like’man vs nature‘.

Again, that’s not allwoman‘and’kind of‘, of course mother nature. According to Hilary Klein, women’s and men’s communication involves a close relationship between ‘woman‘, ‘kind of‘, and ‘mother‘ to do the right thing about the nature of the female subject. He added: “The statement that women see work as an activity that is “closer to nature,” (…) repositions the principle of ‘woman’ in the context of ‘nature’ ..”

Mother Nature in Ocean Pictures: Researchgate

It’s important to get rid of those things. As environmentalists, we can fall into the trap of being conservative and forever in the box of ‘mother nature‘. But some may ask, What about those who think about God with the power of the world and women?—to put in the internet millennial language.

I often think that romanticising is similar to romanticizing other things in life. You have to distinguish between fact and fiction. Gustave Flaubert Madame Bovary a fun analogy. It is a story about Emma Bovary who likes to read love stories with noble men. But regardless of her dreams, gays make her life a lot of trouble. In the end, he couldn’t make the difference between fact and fiction and gave up his life.

Here, let me kill two birds with one stone (although for the sake of an environmental article, you can replace the birds with apples). If you like cheesy romance fiction and if you have always asked if it is a problem with your feminism, the answer should be based on the same criteria – if you define your fantasy as your reality.

There are teachings in the world, including religion, about what to do when the dream becomes reality. Perhaps, the creation of the female form began as a mere fantasy. But given the current state of the environment, we need more action than just ideas to combat environmental change.

Also read: A Queer Character? — Comparing normative concepts around Ecology

Directions:

Marxism, Psychoanalysis and Mother Nature by Hilary Klein in Feminist Studies Vol. 15, No. 2, The Problematics of Heterosexuality (Summer, 1989)


Priyanka Kapoor is a graduate in English Literature from Lady Shri Ram College, University of Delhi. He has been published in platforms like The Indian Quarterly, Hakara, Voice and Verse Poetry Magazine, The Alipore Post, Phantom Kangaroo, etc. He has been nominated for an RL Poetry Award and The Brooklyn Poets’ Fellowship for his poetry. Recently, her poetry was featured in the Yearbook of Indian Poetry in English (2020-21) (edited by Sukrita Paul and Vinita Agrawal)

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